Is This Laundry Out To Dry Or A Protest?

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We’ll go with informational bed sheet.

About 25 pissed off taxi drivers staged a protest outside the Barceló hotel in San Jose’s hotel zone. They hung up a big banner with a message addressed to the tourists that said both in Spanish and Spanglish “Dear tourist: Currently the Uber app does not operate legally in the state. We recommend you not to use their service, as it is illegal.”

Bullshit. Uber has been declared legal by Mexico’s supreme court.

However, our state transportation law requires that public services must be regulated by the state and operate only under permits. However. Many lawmakers in our state have financial interests in the taxi business so they’ve been dragging their feet in giving permits and setting the regulations.

The state governor has also asked lawmakers to get on the Uber train. But the Cabo mayor is part of the taxi mafioso, so Cabo is fighting this harder than La Paz.

Uber and Adalante are, however, operating. Sometimes, taxi drivers spot them and call the traffic police, who impound the vehicle and impose a fine on Uber drivers. The fines are more than $150 but usually are paid within a few hours and cars are released quickly. The Uber regional headquarters vows to keep paying the fines for drivers and keep on operating.