Mexicans Are Making Less Babies

 Mexicans Are Making Less Babies

Here’s an interesting bit of information from the National Population Council that’s shedding light on how Mexico’s demographic landscape is changing. It turns out that the proportion of children aged 11 or younger in Mexico’s population has seen a significant decrease. They now make up just 20 percent of the inhabitants, a noticeable drop from the 28.4 percent recorded back in 1998.

This shift is even more striking when you consider the changes since the 1970s. Back then, the average number of children per woman was around seven. Fast forward to today, and you’ll see a very different trend. A lot of mothers are now choosing to start their families later in life, often waiting until they’re over 29. Additionally, many are opting to have smaller families, with just one or two children, or deciding not to have children at all.

These trends are more than just numbers; they reflect changing attitudes and lifestyles. As Mexico moves forward, we’re expected to see a significant demographic shift. By 2050, projections suggest that the number of elderly people in the country will surpass that of the younger population.

This changing demographic has broad implications for Mexico, from the economy to social services. It’s a sign of evolving societal norms and could lead to new policies and strategies as the country adapts to its aging population. It’s fascinating to see how demographic trends evolve over time and what they mean for the future.