What's Going On In This Country?

October 31, 2016 Edition
BY: SANTIAGO VERDUGO

Gear Up! Halloween is coming and so is Mexico’s holiday, Day of the Dead. What do you do, go trick or treating or build your ofrenda and show some reverence for your dearly departed?

Now you can pay homage to both traditions by wearing a Day of the Dead costume!

Just be aware this is a very controversial costume, as many Mexicans resent diluting their holiday with foreign traditions. They’re calling these costume culturally disrespectful.

The polyester female Day of the Dead costume is a red and black dress with a skeleton print design, mesh skirt, floral corsages and lace trims, loosely based on the traditional long floral Mexican dresses worn by women on Day of the Dead.

The men’s version consists of a top hat attached to a mask, trousers, and a top and jacket with a skeleton design, as Mexican men often wear fine, smart clothing on Dia de los Muertos.

As one Mexican opined:  “It is racist, and cultural appropriation. You cannot cherry pick things from other people’s belief systems and culture just because you think it looks pretty.”

Another Trump whine. The Donald is now saying Carlos Slim, a Mexican and one of the three richest men in the world, and a major New York Times shareholder, is helping bankroll what he called the Times' attempt to help Clinton win the presidential election.

The Times published a story from two women accusing Trump of groping them. "They're not journalists," Mr. Trump said of the Times reporters. "They're corporate lobbyists for Carlos Slim and foreign corporations." Well, Donald, if you believe that, maybe you should rethink that policy of insulting Mexicans in almost every speech.

Meanwhile, Mexican cartoonists are killing him daily, with them all drawing him sporting an exaggerated mop of fake orange hair.

What are we, chopped liver? Mexico’s most prosperous city is the Quintana Roo city of Benito Juárez, whose municipal seat is the city of Cancun, according to an international study by UN-Habitat.

The United Nations agency, in collaboration with the federal housing agency Infonavit, studied 136 municipalities and the 16 boroughs of Mexico City to identify the most — and least — prosperous.

Following Benito Juárez at the top of the list were Cajeme, Sonora; Acuña, Coahuila; and finally, a town on the Baja: La Paz. That’s a dangerous status, since La Paz has no industry and survives only because it is the seat of state power. In other words, the entire town is on the dole. T

Psst! Want a loan? You would have to be desperate to commit to the prevailing bank interest rates, as they average 11.34 percent annually for micro, small and medium-sized businesses, while suppliers charge 6 percent to 12 percent, according to data from the central bank and Canaco Mexico, an association representing businesses. Wow, are we fools or what? The GG always has about $130,000 in revolving accounts receivable and we don’t charge any interest. 

But people are still borrowing, As of July this year, Mexico's commercial banking system had extended a total of 424 billion pesos ($23 billion) in loans to micro, small and medium enterprises, a 25 percent increase from the same month two years ago, according to the country's bank regulator.

Anregio, Mexico's largest lender to small and medium enterprises by portfolio size, reported a return on equity of 18.4 percent at the end of June, nearly six percentage points above the average of the country's 47 banks. Its shares, up more than 30 percent so far this year. Now we really have to start charging interes; that’s a bigger percentage than we make on the paper! We’ll just become money lenders at usury rates. ,