What’s Going On In This Country?

January 9, 2017
BY: SANTIAGO VERDUGO

Hop on the bus, Gus. Who doesn’t love starting the new year by paying more for gas? Prices have jumped 15% to 20 %  and will stay this haigh until March when price controls come off. Fuel prices will then be set by the market rather than by go­vernment decree. This change is part of the federal government’s sweeping energy reforms.

The higher prices will be the result of eliminating government subsidies, higher oil prices, and the weak peso. And if paying more at the pump wasn’t enough, there are also concerns about the possibility of price gouging in regions where there are fewer gas stations, meaning less competition.

 Price controls will first be eliminated in Baja California and Sonora at the end of March, followed by a buncha other states we don’t even care about.

To no one’s surprise. The massive explosion at the San Pablito fireworks market in Tultepec was started when a youngster lit up a rocket, according to one witness. A single was all it took. The chain reaction explosions that followed continued for 20 minutes, witnesses said, killing 35 and injuring as many as 50. There are reports that a dozen people were missing. The market itself was completely destroyed.

Before the accident, it was one of Mexico’s largest fireworks markets, with 280 stores. It was also supposedly one of the safest in Latin America.

The head of the State of México Pyrotechnics Institute, an agency that monitors the production and sale of fireworks, said eight days before the blast the market had high safety standards for the spacing between stores, designed to prevent exactly the type of chain reaction that caused the explosion.

But, this is Mexico, so while there might well have been adequate spacing by design, there wasn’t in practice.

The director of Tultepec’s pyrotechnics promotion office has admitted that days before the blast, vendors had moved into the 20 foot spaces between stores. Vendors had been moved out of those spaces but moved back in so they could maximize their sales during the busy Christmas season.

Druggie Christmas. Members of the Cártel del Noreste (CDN) played Santa and delivered truckloads of toys and Christmas dinners on December 26 to some of the poorest neighborhoods in Nuevo Laredo, over on the mainland.

Children reportedly got two presents each, and the women were given blankets and a Christmas dinner that included turkey.

Stickers attached to each of the gifts read: “This Christmas, let joy be your best outfit, your smile the best gift, your goals the best destiny and your happiness my best wish. CDN wishes you all a Merry Christmas 2016.”

It’s enough to make your Grinchy heart swell, isn’t it?.

Capital gains law causes uproar. Mexico City new constitution has a law that is causing uproar between citizens as it could allow the government to keep the capital gains on any property owned.

The law itself doesn't literally say that, what it does say is that "the increase of value of any land that come from the urbanization process are considered part of the public wealth of the city and thus the law will regulate it's exploitation in order to restore ecosystems or degraded parts of the city"

Citizens were quick to gather and protest the new law with signs that said "the end of private property is here", so Mayor Mancera had to step up and gave a press conference where he said that the whole thing was just a misinterpretation of the law and that he was instructing members of the legislative assembly to change the wording on the law to avoid any future misinterpretations.

Free rides in Guadalajra. Due to the gas spike about 35 routes of public transport buses went on strike in Guadalajara demanding an increase on the price they can charge users of public transportation, which is regulated by the government.

Since thousands of people had no way to get home or work that day people went to social media with the hashtag #RaiteGDL offering free rides, people went as far as doing the same routes as the buses on strike, some even had little signs made on their windows to let people know they were giving free rides.

By the end of the day police, fireman and several government offices who had vehicles were also giving free rides to people.