Governor Reverts New Water Law

All that picketing actually helped
BY: GUNGA DIN

After serveral peaceful protests state wide which were threatening to paralyze the state government, the governor finally decided to revert the recently passed controversial water law.

This new law that was just approved on December 21st was said to be focused on guaranteeing water for everyone in the state with heavy investment on new water projects.

The problem was that between the lines three things popped up which caused uproar with citizens

1. Private companies were going to be able to participate in the water distribution and treatment. This was something that was widely criticized by citizens and the state business council, mostly because they saiad this was the start of privatizing a public service.

2. After three months of not paying your water bill you'll get no water at all.  Right now the mexican law says that water is public and that the government can't cut off your water service, even if you don't pay, they can however reduce the flow to just very little water. This new law would allow authorities or private comapnies to completely cut off the water to any property.

3. The water bill would go up about 30%. Since the governor said that the price of water hadn't gone up in a few years and that new taxes and the hike in gas prices had elevated the cost of supplying water to everyone water was going to cost more.

These were the main things that caused discomfort between citizens of the state, add to that the hike in gas prices and you have an angry crowd on the streets.

At the end the governor and his party, the PAN, decided to revert the brand new law but he said in a widely circulated video that he was doing it because he wanted to do as the people wanted but that personally he still tought that was the best option in the long run to guarantee water for everyone in the years to come.

Who was right? I guess we will see in the coming years. It is definitely a reality that we need to change water laws but probably not in a way that is so radical. It was really bad timing too, because it came almost at the same time as the hike in gas and electricity prices.